Woodlands have a direct impact on the environment, climate, and local ecosystem. British woodlands are incredibly diverse in both flora and fauna and are great for wildlife.

Our woodland's estate has been developing for around 30 years - in that time, we have purchased or been bequeathed a number of sites that we manage and maintain for their unique biodiversity value and benefits to wildlife. Woodlands are not static - they are dynamic - living entities - that grow and develop uniquely, based the habitat and species that grow or live there. 

Above is a new meadow and lake recently restored.

Save Me’s woodlands are managed to provide a broad variety of habitats needed for our native wildlife, but also to provide the mosaic of habitats for the flora and fungi. 

Woodlands are unique and individual - they adapt to the soil and local climatic conditions. The UK has a range of woodland habitats such as Upland, Lowland, Ancient, Wet, and even rain forests! Each with its own unique mosaic of habitats and diversity of fauna and flora.

Woodlands are great for air quality too, they are the lungs of country. With their potential to ‘soak up’ CO2 from the atmosphere they are becoming even more vital to clear the pollution from modern living.

As plants 'breathe' and ‘exhale’ they help cool the atmosphere. Plants consume carbon dioxide - a significant greenhouse gas -in the process of photosynthesis. The reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has an indirect cooling effect, that is particularly valuable in urban areas and inner cities. 

Woodlands play a key role in the UK’s flood management plan. The techniques we incorporate are often referred to as Natural Flood Management. This is a range of natural features that seek to store or slow down flood waters through measures such as the species and tree planting patterns, the addition of Lakes and waterways, wetland area creation, river restoration, or the creation of intertidal habitats

Save Me’s woodlands are ‘Forever Homes’ for wildlife, providing safe, natural habitats for foraging, burrowing, perching and hiding - everything our native wildlife needs to live ‘natural’ wild lives.

And, of course, Woodlands can be great for people too. The physical benefits of walking, cycling or horse riding through woods have long been enjoyed, and finally, the mental health and well-being aspects of being ‘out in nature’ are being recognised for the real benefits they can bring to people’s everyday wellbeing and those with mental illness.

For more information e-mail us [email protected] 

 

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